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Raman microspectroscopy


Raman microspectroscopyIn Raman microspectroscopy the information of the mineral component and the organic matrix is obtained simultaneously by creating a complete picture of bone composition. The collection of Raman spectra from both, the organic and mineral constituent is crucial for better understanding the bone physiology.


Raman microspectroscopyBone is a composite material, comprising mineral, organic, and water phases at multiple levels of hierarchy. The mineral fraction of bone is a highly impure carbonated apatite situated between collagen fibril cross-links and fibril ends. In Raman spectra of bone tissues the phosphate ν1 band (960 cm-1) and the bands associated with collagen (amide III at 1250 cm-1 and amide I at 1665 cm-1) are of particular interest for bone compositional studies.


Raman microspectroscopyBone has a heterogeneous nature and therefore simple point Raman microspectroscopy cannot adequately describe the chemical microstructure of bone. For this reason Raman spectroscopic imaging is increasingly popular for the analysis of complex organized systems. By using the Raman imaging it is possible to collect spectra point by point across a defined bone sample area.


In cooperation with the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, Germany (www.mpikg.mpg.de) bone osteonal tissues have been measured by Raman imaging to demonstrate the versatility of the analytical technique, and provide insights into the organization of bone tissue at the ultra structural level.For further information see: Kazanci et al. J Struct Biol 156, 2006; Kazanci et al. Calcif Tissue Int 79, 2006; Kazanci et al. Bone 41, 2007.

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